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We're against the censorship of art. However, we believe in explaining when an image contains genitalia.
  • The Social Distancing Festival- An International Platform Of Connection
  • The Social Distancing Festival- An International Platform Of Connection
  • The Social Distancing Festival- An International Platform Of Connection
  • The Social Distancing Festival- An International Platform Of Connection
  • The Social Distancing Festival- An International Platform Of Connection

juno rosenhaus

i will not be pretty for you: vulvas queered

Jessica Parry
Jessica Parry
+June 15, 2021
Photo-artist Juno Rosenhaus creates images that explore feminist identities, self-perception, and queer communities. Juno’s practice is informed by personal experiences as a dyke-identified social justice activist. Her gender-inclusive project I Will Not Be Pretty For You: Vulvas Queered is a collaboration between photographer and subject that asks the participant to consider their own vision of their vulva. The word vulva is defined here as "external genitalia of many females, males, and intersex people." The work is an on-going series that pushes the conversation of genitals being equal to a person's gender and challenges the idea that all vulvas look the same. 

This series takes the stigma surrounding the vulva and shows a colorful variety of them. No two participants involved envisioned their vulva in the same way as another, which directly speaks to the underlying theme of the project. “Social assumptions about what vulvas should look like can lead to shame, confusion, psychological distress, and unnecessary surgeries. The images in I Will Not Be Pretty For You convey vulvas re-imagined, vulvas queered.” The viewer is shown an honest yet creative set of photographs that challenges societal assumptions about what the anatomy of a vulva should look like. 
 
Female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) has become more common over the last 10 years. One of the most common reasons for seeking out surgery is shame about how the vulva looks to an intimate partner. This increase in FCGS is likely due to both hair removal becoming more common and unrealistic expectations of bodies from porn. Juno’s project contributes to the conversation of a person’s genitals matching their gender. The viewer is not shown a face, clothing, or any other parts of participants bodies. It’s left to the viewer's imagination to invent a person behind the vulva. 
We're against the censorship of art. However, we believe in explaining when an image contains genitalia.
FFU image
Juno hosts a monthly photo critique for women and non-binary people and has a Dyke ArtHaus Collective in the works. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States. She lives and works on occupied Lenape Nation land in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
Jessica Parry
Jessica Parry
art

Photographer who loves creating conceptual and fine art images. She is truly passionate about collec...

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